Enter the Toltec

Sherrie Locke, written on 5 Kat, January 2014

For many of you who know me personally, you know that I am a very private person, preferring to work in the background or as the support system for friends and clients. Many times I have chosen to live life “under a rock” or in the outback, always on the “Universal Relocation Program” (which I will discuss in a future post).

In my life I have been initiated into many traditions. I found out later that my invitations for these initiations came due to the fact that whichever elder I ran into was interested enough in me to “look into” what I am.

Shortly thereafter I would receive an invitation to accept (or not) the inner initiations of that tribe or culture. Thus I have reached this juncture with an extremely diverse set of skills and knowledge.

On many occasions I have also had the opportunity to share knowledge I have learned from other cultures and to make correlations that have deepened my understanding of each culture and the interconnectedness of it all. This knowledge has allowed me to experience what I term the “golden thread” that connects us all together.

Sometimes names, words or phrases used are different. Within each ceremony, each tradition, lies a commonality, a base, a union, an understanding of who we are and what we want for this planet and the generations to come. So there is a similar “tone” going on. I call it The Prime Directive. All this diversity makes for an interesting life.

It was around 2007 that I came into contact with the Toltec tradition. The ball game changed dramatically at that point. I had been working with an engineer in Florida on a tech project when one night, very late (we used to work until sunrise), he asked me if I knew anything about the Toltec teachings. I said “No, nothing really, other than some references from the Carlos Casteneda books I read many years ago.” I really knew nothing about it.

Charley told me a fascinating story of his life and how he came into contact with a wonderful teacher (which, I now know, was a funny statement) Cheyenne Maloney. The reason I say its a funny statement is that Cheyenne really doesn’t like or use the word “teacher,” so we lovingly call her our Fuda. (It’s a word we made up for our “fearless leader,” who prefers not to label things in general.)

This began a new chapter in my life, a move to Florida and a subsequent relocation to Guatemala. All due to the amazing effects of walking the Toltec path, which is not an easy one and certainly not for everyone.

I will elaborate on the Toltec belief system and adjustment of the human assemblage point in a future blog.

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